WHAT IS MEANS TO BE A BOARD CERTIFIED
VETERINARY SURGEON

Specialties are recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association's American Board of Veterinary Specialties (ABVS). The American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) is the AVMA-recognized veterinary specialty organization™ for certification of veterinarians in large animal surgery and small animal surgery. The ACVS undergoes a comprehensive evaluation by the ABVS, a committee of the American Veterinary Medical Association, every three years to ensure that we are maintaining the required standards for our certification process.

If your animal develops a problem or injury requiring advanced care and procedures, your primary veterinarian or emergency room veterinarian may refer you to a veterinary surgeon.

Advanced Training

A veterinary surgeon has undergone additional training after veterinary school in order to become a specialist. This training consists of a minimum of a 1-year internship followed by a 3-year residency program that meets guidelines established by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS).

During the residency, there are specific training and caseload requirements that must be met. In addition to these requirements, applicants must perform research that is published in a scientific journal and then passes a rigorous examination.
 

Specialists are called a “Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons” or a “board-certified surgeon.”

Learn more here.